Wit Beyond Measure

Frieda. 16. Please use she/her/hers. Any quotes that tickle my fancy. Fandom blog found at forever-crying-because-fandoms.


Ask me anything  
Reblogged from creatingaquietmind
Life becomes easier when you learn to accept an apology you never got. Robert Brault (via bl-ossomed)

(Source: creatingaquietmind, via icantfindacreativeurl)

Reblogged from blackestdespondency
A regret understood by no one: the regret to be a pessimist. It’s not easy to be on the wrong foot with life. Emil Cioran (via blackestdespondency)

(via wellwrittenword)

Reblogged from folieadude

folieadude:

we aaaaaare wild

we are like

image

(via isthisgospel)

Reblogged from e-cstasiy
There is not one person in this world that is not cripplingly sad about something. You remember that before you open your mouth. (via thewastedgeneration)

(Source: e-cstasiy, via drbonememccoy)

Reblogged from cold-never-bothered-me-anyways

sherlock-senpai:

britishstarr:

kkristoff:

cold-never-bothered-me-anyways:

Arabian Little Red Riding Hood with a red hijab

A Japanese Snow White with her coveted pale skin and shiny black hair

Mexican Cinderella with colorful Mexican glass blown slippers

Greek Beauty and the Beast where Beast is a minotaur

Culture-bent fairy tales that keep key canonical characteristics

GIVE ME THESE I M M E D I A T E L Y

I AM SO TEMPTED TO DRAW THIS YOU HAVE NO IDEA

DRAW IT

(via shsllannister)

Reblogged from jemeos
Art exists because life is not enough. Ferreira Gullar  (via stolenwine)

(Source: jemeos, via wintersololier)

Reblogged from gnoth
For each person there is a sentence—a series of words—which has the power to destroy them. Philip K. Dick (via cestlavieparis)

(Source: gnoth, via colinmorgasms)

Reblogged from merulae
Raise your words, not voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder. Rumi  (via yudoku)

(Source: merulae, via thatweirdfandomgirl)

Reblogged from the-healing-nest
Some people live in cages with bars built from their own fears and doubts. Some people live in cages with bars built from other people’s fears and doubts; their parents, their friends, their brothers and sisters, their families. Some people live in cages with bars built from the choices others made for them, the circumstances other people imposed upon them. And some people break free.  C. JoyBell C. (via creatingaquietmind)

(Source: the-healing-nest, via wellwrittenword)

Reblogged from six6vi
earthdragon1:

felicityredbarrow:

sappire-charizard:

six6vi:

Just in case

I’m actually going to reblog a thing just because this is really important.
As someone who has epilepsy and used to have several grand mal seizures a day, I’d also like to add that “offer help” can range anywhere from keeping the person calm to explaining to them where they are and what they were doing to even just telling them they should sit and rest for a while longer (lack or coordination is common, and it can be hard to walk straight or see clearly).
It’s okay for them to take up to a half hour to fully regain their bearings and sort out what they were doing prior to the seizure. Just answer any questions calmly and be there for support.
If they come around and you start to panic or shake them or ask them what the heck is wrong with them they are going to freak out and panic too.
I cannot stress it enough that this is bad.
If someone has a seizure and they come out of it, please. please stay calm.They are likely disoriented and confused, even if it’s only for a minute or two, and you don’t want them panicking on top of that because they can have another seizure as a result.

IMPORTANT

I’m gonna add on here for people, like me, who have Absence Seizures. It can appear like we’re suddenly staring off into space or daydreaming. But that’s not the case. An absence seizure causes a person to disengage from the world and their own senses. For instance, I could be in the middle of conversation with you, and then I might suddenly stop speaking, my eyes might seem to lose focus and I might appear to stare ahead or off to the side; sometimes I might click my tongue or smack my lips. A person who is carrying something may drop it, or actually be unable to let an object go. Someone who is walking may stop, or they may continue walking with no regard for direction or traffic.
These symptoms can last from a few seconds to a couple of minutes. During this time, NOTHING YOU DO CAN BRING ME OR ANYONE ELSE OUT OF AN ABSENCE SEIZURE! You cannot shake a person out it; you cannot yell at them and make them snap out of it. YOU CANNOT SLAP A PERSON IN THE FACE AND SUDDENLY BRING THEM BACK TO THEIR SENSES! The best thing to do is time the seizure with a watch, and do your best to guide the person away from anything that might harm them. These types of seizures can be especially harmful because the sufferer can still actually be mobile while they happen, but the person would not feel pain should they have an accident. For instance, I could be cooking at my stove when an absence seizure hits and I could burn my hand in the flame, but I WOULD NOT KNOW IT until the seizure ended!
As an absence seizure ends, a person may or may not be confused or a little unsettled. Some people immediately go right back to what they were doing before the seizure hit, unaware that a seizure has happened at all. Other people may experience some confusion, dizziness, light-headedness, feeling faint, fatigue, and some mood changes. This is all completely normal after this type of seizure. Please help this person to a safe place, and help them document the time/date/duration of the seizure. If an absence seizure ever lasts for five (5) minutes or more, contact emergency/medical personnel.

earthdragon1:

felicityredbarrow:

sappire-charizard:

six6vi:

Just in case

I’m actually going to reblog a thing just because this is really important.

As someone who has epilepsy and used to have several grand mal seizures a day, I’d also like to add that “offer help” can range anywhere from keeping the person calm to explaining to them where they are and what they were doing to even just telling them they should sit and rest for a while longer (lack or coordination is common, and it can be hard to walk straight or see clearly).

It’s okay for them to take up to a half hour to fully regain their bearings and sort out what they were doing prior to the seizure. Just answer any questions calmly and be there for support.

If they come around and you start to panic or shake them or ask them what the heck is wrong with them they are going to freak out and panic too.

I cannot stress it enough that this is bad.

If someone has a seizure and they come out of it, please. please stay calm.
They are likely disoriented and confused, even if it’s only for a minute or two, and you don’t want them panicking on top of that because they can have another seizure as a result.

IMPORTANT

I’m gonna add on here for people, like me, who have Absence Seizures. It can appear like we’re suddenly staring off into space or daydreaming. But that’s not the case. An absence seizure causes a person to disengage from the world and their own senses. For instance, I could be in the middle of conversation with you, and then I might suddenly stop speaking, my eyes might seem to lose focus and I might appear to stare ahead or off to the side; sometimes I might click my tongue or smack my lips. A person who is carrying something may drop it, or actually be unable to let an object go. Someone who is walking may stop, or they may continue walking with no regard for direction or traffic.

These symptoms can last from a few seconds to a couple of minutes. During this time, NOTHING YOU DO CAN BRING ME OR ANYONE ELSE OUT OF AN ABSENCE SEIZURE! You cannot shake a person out it; you cannot yell at them and make them snap out of it. YOU CANNOT SLAP A PERSON IN THE FACE AND SUDDENLY BRING THEM BACK TO THEIR SENSES! The best thing to do is time the seizure with a watch, and do your best to guide the person away from anything that might harm them. These types of seizures can be especially harmful because the sufferer can still actually be mobile while they happen, but the person would not feel pain should they have an accident. For instance, I could be cooking at my stove when an absence seizure hits and I could burn my hand in the flame, but I WOULD NOT KNOW IT until the seizure ended!

As an absence seizure ends, a person may or may not be confused or a little unsettled. Some people immediately go right back to what they were doing before the seizure hit, unaware that a seizure has happened at all. Other people may experience some confusion, dizziness, light-headedness, feeling faint, fatigue, and some mood changes. This is all completely normal after this type of seizure. Please help this person to a safe place, and help them document the time/date/duration of the seizure. If an absence seizure ever lasts for five (5) minutes or more, contact emergency/medical personnel.

(via waitingforproof)